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by SHIVAM INFRASTRUCTURE 08 Aug 2019

This landmark legislation passed 50 years ago — learn your rights and how to defend them.

If you’ve searched for a new place to live recently, you’ve likely seen the Equal Housing Opportunity logo (an equal sign inside a house) on a landlord’s, real estate agent’s or lender’s paperwork. But the Fair Housing Act is more than just a logo. It’s a federal law designed to protect renters and buyers from discrimination. Here are some key points to know about the Fair Housing Act when you’re searching for a place to live.


What is the Fair Housing Act?


Also known as the Civil Rights Act of 1968, the Fair Housing Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson just days after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., who had championed the cause for many years.


The act prohibits housing discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability and familial status (sex was added in 1974, and disability and familial status were added in 1988).


At the time the act was signed, overt housing discrimination was a huge problem throughout the country, including the attempted segregation of whole neighborhoods and the outright rejection of qualified renters based on race and other factors.


Today, much of the discrimination in the housing market is less obvious, but it’s still an unfortunate reality.


According to the National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA), over 25,000 housing discrimination complaints were filed with the federal government and local and national fair housing agencies in 2017. Over half of the complaints were based on disability, followed by the race at 20 percent.


But these numbers reflect only reported incidents. The NFHA estimates that over 4 million instances of housing discrimination occur annually, but many people don’t realize they’ve been discriminated against — or know what steps to take when it happens.